Sleep Diagnostics of Minnesota Sleep Diagnostics of Minnesota
    Sleep Diagnostics of Minnesota

Upon completion of the study, your results will be shared with your primary care physician for further action.

All Scoring is done by Registered Polysomnagraphic Technicians (RPSGT's) All Interpretations and quality assurance is done by a Board Certified Sleep Physician

Common Questions & Answers

1. What is a Polysomnogram (sleep study)?

2. Is the procedure covered by insurance?

3. Is there any pain with the test?

4. What should I bring to the sleep study?

5. How can I sleep with so many wires and sensors?

6. What is a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT)?


1. What is a Polysomnogram (sleep study)?

A polysomnogram is a study that measures the quality of your sleep. It is a test of sleep cycles and stages through the use of continuous recordings of brain waves (EEG), electrical activity of muscles, eye movement (electrooculogram), breathing rate, blood pressure, blood oxygen saturation, and heart rhythm and direct observation of the person during sleep.

There are two states of sleep: non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. REM sleep is associated with dreaming and paralysis of body muscles (except for the eye and diaphragm muscles). NREM sleep has four stages distinguishable by EEG waves. REM sleep alternates with NREM sleep approximately every 90 minutes. A person with normal sleep usually has four to five cycles of REM and NREM sleep during a night.

Each study will be somewhat unique to the individual depending upon each patient and their circumstances. A typical polysomnogram includes monitoring the following:

Brain waves (electrodes placed on the scalp)
Eye movement (electrodes placed on the face, by the eyes)
Chin Muscle Tone (electrodes placed on or near the chin)
Heart rate (electrodes placed on the chest)
Leg movements (electrodes placed on the legs)
Breathing (breathing sensor placed near the nose and mouth)
Breathing effort (two small elastic belts placed around chest and abdomen)
Oxygen level (small sensor attached to the finger)
Audio and Video Taping



2. Is the procedure covered by insurance?

Most medical insurance plans will cover sleep studies, although your deductibles and percentages of coverage will vary. Specific questions about your coverage should be directed to your insurance company, and they will verify insurance benefits and coverage prior to your sleep study. Please contact us with any questions or concerns you may have.



3. Is there any pain with the test?

No, this is a painless and non-invasive monitoring procedure.



4. What should I bring to the sleep study?

The rooms are supplied with pillows, blankets, towels and wash cloths. The suite is equiped with a private bathroom and shower. Below are some guidelines on what you might bring with you for your study.

  • Although pillows are provided, you may want to bring your own pillow, since some people sleep better with their own pillows.
  • Sleeping clothes (pajamas) are necessary, not optional. Please wear something loose and comfortable, such as gym shorts and a t-shirt, sweat pants and a t-shirt, or pajamas.
  • Any needed personal toiletries.
  • A change of clothes for after the study.
  • Any medications, both prescription and over the counter, that you need to take while at the Sleep Study. We are unable to dispense any medications. Do not stop taking any of your medications without first consulting your physician.
  • Reading material or something to help you wind down before bedtime.
  • Avoid caffeine or stimulants for 12 hours before your scheduled time of arrival, unless prescribed by your doctor.
  • Please make sure your skin and hair are clean. Please do not use any hair products or lotions on the night of your study. Washcloths and towels are available upon your arrival to remove any remaining makeup before your study begins, and to clean up following the study.
  • You may bring snacks if you wish. A kitchenette equipped with a refrigerator and microwave is included in your suite.


5. How can I sleep with so many wires and sensors?

Most people sleep reasonably well. The goal is to obtain a sample of your sleep pattern. The body sensors are applied so that you have the flexibility to move during sleep, and change positions during the night. Rooms are set to be as comfortable as possible.



6. What is a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT)?

Some people also participate in daytime testing. This test consists of a series of 20-minute naps. Sensors & electrodes are used to record data, similar to the polysomnogram test. 20-minute naps are given at two hour intervals throughout the day. Please bring something to read or work on during the day to help keep you occupied between naps. A TV and VCR and/or DVD player are also available. The MSLT test is usually completed by 5:00-6:00 p.m.




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